Is it useful to call God “good” if he’s the standard for “goodness?”

I have been particularly interested in the Moral Argument recently, but have stumbled upon something I find perplexing. What is the meaning of calling God “good”? If God is the standard for goodness, it seems to me that the reasoning must be circular. The phrase is only meaningful if you refer to something outside God, … More Is it useful to call God “good” if he’s the standard for “goodness?”

Does the fact of logical truth point to God?

I recently bumped into the transcendental argument for God’s existence. The idea is that logical truth is true whether or not human minds exist. These truths are non-physical, so they transcend the physical world. Since logical truth is a conception in the mind, and since logical truth transcends the universe, there must be a transcendent … More Does the fact of logical truth point to God?

Does God command us to obey him? – Divine Command Theory and Circularity

Some object to the Moral Argument for God’s existence by criticizing Divine Command Theory (DCT).  They argue that DCT doesn’t ground objective moral values and duties because it relies on a moral axiom: that we ought to obey God. First, we can recognize that this criticism applies to moral duties, but not to values.  Moral … More Does God command us to obey him? – Divine Command Theory and Circularity

Why can theism better account for moral facts?

Does your definition of objective moral truths implicitly postulate the existence of an external moral agent? Dr. Sam Harris has said the fundamental moral fact is that the maximizing of human flourishing is good. The objection is, “Why is the maximizing of human flourishing good?” Couldn’t someone ask you, “Why is obeying God objectively moral?” … More Why can theism better account for moral facts?

Unjustified Agnosticism: Micah Edvenson’s case for skepticism (part 3)

We now turn to Edvenson’s last two arguments against God’s existence: Determinism and Material Causality. You can find Edvenson’s post HERE. Edvenson’s discussion of determinism seems incomplete in the article. For that reason, I will include what I can gather about his position from his conversation with Graham Oppy on 8/3/2020. Brief Summary Edvenson points out … More Unjustified Agnosticism: Micah Edvenson’s case for skepticism (part 3)

Unjustified Agnosticism: Micah Edvenson’s case for skepticism (part 2)

This is the second reaction article to Micah Edvenson’s case for agnosticism. Our last post focused on explanatory power with a particular focus on the arguments from divine hiddenness and religious disagreement. You can find that post here. In this article, we’ll look at Edvenson’s second argument for atheism: evil and animal suffering. I recommend reviewing his … More Unjustified Agnosticism: Micah Edvenson’s case for skepticism (part 2)

Unjustified Agnosticism: Micah Edvenson’s case for skepticism

I was impressed with Edvenson’s exploration of Leibniz’s argument in his article, Justifying Agnosticism. He approached Leibniz with an open mind and fair considerations. I thought it worthwhile to respond to the concerns he raises in support of naturalism (thus balancing out the case for theism and leaving him agnostic). Perhaps you are concerned with … More Unjustified Agnosticism: Micah Edvenson’s case for skepticism

Is God unjust in creating people without their permission?

Is God bringing you into existence (being born) somehow unjust in that you don’t have a say, and then HAVE to choose between hell and heaven? It has brought me tremendous discomfort. We aren’t dealing with theology here so much as ethics.  The critic says it was wrong for God to bring about your precarious … More Is God unjust in creating people without their permission?